Aug
05

PC-BSD 10.2-RC1 Now Available

The PC-BSD team is pleased to announce the availability of RC1 images for the upcoming 10.2 release. Please test these images out and report any issues found on our bug tracker: https://bugs.pcbsd.org

 

PC-BSD 10.2 Notable Changes

  • FreeBSD 10.2 base system
  • Many bugfixes and enhancements to installer to dual-boot setups
  • New CD-sized network installation media, with Wifi Configuration via GUI
  • Switched to “iocage” for jail management backend
  • Disk Manager GUI now available via installer GUI
  • Bug-fixes and improvements to Life-Preserver replications
  • Improved localization options for login manager
  • Options to Enable / Disable SSHD or IPv6 at installation
  • New “Plugins” system for AppCafe, allowing download of pre-built jail environments
  • Improvements to look-n-feel of AppCafe for package management
  • Improved fonts and better support for 4K monitor setups
  • Enterprise package repo, which only has security updates, allowing users to run a server / desktop or jail with fairly consistent package versions.
  • FireFox 39.0
  • Chromium 43.0.2357.134
  • Thunderbird 38.1.0
  • Lumina 0.8.6

 

Updating

Users currently running the EDGE package repo can now update their packages via the updater GUI or “pc-updatemanager” utility to be brought up to date with RC1. Updates for users on the 10.1.2 / PRODUCTION repo will be available once 10.2-RELEASE is announced.

 

Getting media

10.2-RC1 DVD/USB media can be downloaded from the following URL via HTTP or Torrent. http://download.pcbsd.org/iso/10.2-RELEASE/edge/amd64/

 

Reporting Bugs

Found a bug in 10.2? Please report it (with as much detail as possible) to our bugs database. https://bugs.pcbsd.org

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Written by Ken Moore. Posted in 10.2, new features, testers

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Comments (21)

  • Sérgio
    August 5, 2015 at 11:16 am |

    Is Skype 4 fixed for 10.2 as well? Or just for 11.0?
    https://freshports.org/net-im/skype4/

  • sg1efc
    August 5, 2015 at 6:03 pm |

    Thanks everyone! 🙂

    • Lynn
      August 20, 2015 at 7:32 am |

      In reply to the guy that said PCBSD is too bloated with unneeded software, I just would like to thank you for the bloat. Add as much bloat as you can, I say. If it does seem to be a common complaint, release a super trim version with the full over bloated version filled to the brim with unneeded software, drivers, effects etc. Otherwise, his other comments could be considered similar to mine, although I’d always pick stable over pretty. I hope that sounded nice, I meant it in a super nice way. swears:)

      • sg1efc
        August 20, 2015 at 7:45 am |

        I think you intended to reply to another part of this section, but replying to my post is no problem to me. 🙂

  • Andrew
    August 5, 2015 at 11:49 pm |

    I have tested the new release and here are some of my observations:

    1) The default design and user interface of the installer and most apps look very bad, as if they were made at the end of the 90’s.
    You should hire a designer because even though they shouldn’t most people unfortunately do judge a book by it’s cover and PCBSD “covers” are not very good and changing the design and style and improving the ergonomy are much easier to do than implementing important functionality and have a large impact on new users.

    The ugliest one is the new web based AppCafe which not only looks like an 15 year old intranet app made for IE6 before AJAX and HTML5 but it’s also missing a lot of the features of the older app and it’s annoying to use, for example if you tell it to install some apps and then continue to browse others it keeps refreshing the whole page moving the scroll back to the top of the page.

    The graphical updater does not display enough information compared to the command line, for example if there is an error the command line gives more detail while the GUI says there is an error but looks like it’s continuing trying to update.
    Maybe you should put a read only command line in the GUI and display the same output as from the CLI.

    2) PCBSD is too bloated, too many unnecessary applications and libraries are installed automatically not only by the installer but also by the PBI system from appcafe. An installation of PCBSD is much larger than a FreeBSD one with identical functionality.

    3) The updating process looks unnecessary complex, instead of only updating what it needs to update it removes EVERYTHING and then downloads and installs EVERYTHING. Not only that this takes a lot of time and bandwidth (and your servers are really, really, really slow!) but it also wears SSD’s which have a limited number of write cycles.

    Also it’s not clear to me what happens when you update to a new version and it can’t find some of the installed software in the new repositories, I hope that the answer is not that it deletes that software automatically.

    But I do admire the fact that this process even if it is very inefficient it is very safe because of how you use snapshots and failed updates leave the system clean and unaltered.

    4) The Lumina desktop looks more like in early alpha stages, and just like I said at 1) it needs more attention from a designer and better ergonomy.
    It has to many problems to list them here but I will try to just list just a few small ones: the panel is missing a right click menu for configuration, the start menu doesn’t have a log out entry, the desktop image cannot be properly customized, the window themes don’t have a preview, the icon view for the file manager looks too “crowded”, I can’t configure if I want to use the trash or delete immediately and in general the file manager doesn’t seem to have any options.
    Also you are using to many icons with no text so for a new user it’s hard to find out where the functionality is hidden, you should really use more buttons with text and icon and not icon only.
    And put more space around stuff.

    5) The installer created for me GPT partitions even though I chose MBR and even though I told it I want zero swap it still created a tiny swap partition.

    6) I tested this in VirtualBOX and it doesn’t boot if I use the ICH9 chipset, it only works with PIIX3 but the last time I tried FreeeBSD installs and works fine with the ICH9 chipset from VirtualBOX so this is a PCBSD only problem in your installer.

    7) The GRUB configuration utility should have an option of changing the default VGA options since for example in VirtualBOX there is a bug that makes text scrolling look bad with some GRUB configuration but it works fine with the default text option and I couldn’t find an easy way to configure this.

    I do appreciate the great effort you are making in PCBSD and the great number of features you are constantly adding and you are maybe the fastest developing OS/distribution.
    But PCBSD doesn’t look like an OS I would recommend to an average user yet, you need to improve its looks and ergonomy and make it more efficient first.

    Good luck and keep doing all this great work, this comment is more like a general bug report and not a critique, I am trying to be helpful by providing feedback.

    • Andrew
      August 6, 2015 at 12:28 am |

      I wanted to add:

      8) I don’t like that in many apps you seem like you are trying to hide advanced configuration options from users and only offer very basic information and options.

      The updater, AppCafe, the disk tool, the boot loader tool and others should have more configuration options and the ability to display more information to the user like for example the command line output of what is being done behind the scenes.

      Especially the new AppCafe looks like a very dumbed down version of what it used to be.

      I understand that you want to hide advanced stuff from new users but you should also give more experienced users more configuration options and more information if they want it.

    • Gour
      August 6, 2015 at 11:46 pm |

      Hello Andrew,

      I did install 10.2RC1 yesterday on my netbook…

      >1) The default design and user interface of the >installer and most apps look very bad, as if they >were made at the end of the 90’s.

      Recently I was playing for some time with VoidLinux distro which has only very plain text installer and then I was installing Debian’s Jessie/testing…

      Yes, there is huge difference between the two, but the main thing for me is that both installers are clear in accomplishing the task of installing OS on my HD.

      So, I’d say that PC-BSD installer does its job by clearly conveying info the the user which info to enter to do the task.

      Considering, that PC-BSD is kind of rolling-distro, it means installer is used once and that’s it, more or less. 🙂

      > The ugliest one is the new web based AppCafe which >not only looks like an 15 year old intranet app made >for IE6 before AJAX and HTML5 but it’s also missing a >lot of the features of the older app and it’s >annoying to use, for example if you tell it to >install some apps and then continue to browse others >it keeps refreshing the whole page moving the scroll >back to the top of the page.

      I agree that refreshing is a bit annoying, but I’m mostly browsing freshports.org to know what’s available.

      > The graphical updater does not display enough >information compared to the command line, for example >if there is an error the command line gives more >detail while the GUI says there is an error but looks >like it’s continuing trying to update.

      Yeah, I recommend to use cli tools…Before exploring VoidLinux I was using openSUSE for some time which tries to GUI-ize many task of syste-admin work, but I was not overly impressed.

      >2) PCBSD is too bloated, too many unnecessary >applications and libraries are installed >automatically not only by the installer but also by >the PBI system from appcafe. An installation of PCBSD >is much larger than a FreeBSD one with identical >functionality.

      Well, the two OS-es are meant for different targets, and I’d say that PC-BSD provides very nice OS for less savvy users…

      >3) The updating process looks unnecessary complex, >instead of only updating what it needs to update it >removes EVERYTHING and then downloads and installs >EVERYTHING. Not only that this takes a lot of time >and bandwidth (and your servers are really, really, >really slow!) but it also wears SSD’s which have a >limited number of write cycles.

      Isn’t the above ‘feature’ which uses chroot and snapshots to be sure that you don’t end with broken OS after unsuccessful upgrade which is very common scenario with Linux distros?

      >4) The Lumina desktop looks more like in early alpha >stages, and just like I said at 1) it needs more >attention from a designer and better ergonomy.

      To me Lumina is one of the main reasons to use PC-BSD…it provides some fresh air into the world of DE which are just becoming more bloated (my Linux desktop machine runs Xfce which is acceptable), but there are some very attractive features coming to upcoming Lumina 0.9 and I’d say that, unlike many Linux distros which practically just package things together, PC-BSD/Lumina are innovative, but let’s give them time and/or help them.

      > the start menu doesn’t have a log out entry,

      Log-out is available on the desktop with rigt-click?

      > the desktop image cannot be properly customized,

      What do you mean?

      >the window themes don’t have a preview, the icon view >for the file manager looks too “crowded”, I can’t >configure if I want to use the trash or delete >immediately and in general the file manager doesn’t >seem to have any options.

      Use Thunar, or something else. Lumina is practically one-man project and I’m *very* impressed what is achieved in very short period of time in comparison with other DEs with codebases counted in years with hordes of devs.

      Lastly, the fact that Lumina is the desktop written for BSD which means freedom from different Linuxism bloat (like systemd) means that BSD users will have decent choice and not always patching/adjusting the upstream.

      >5) The installer created for me GPT partitions even >though I chose MBR and even though I told it I want >zero swap it still created a tiny swap partition.

      I also had some issues with installer and the only option which I was able to install to was UEFI/GPT, while GPT/BIOS & GPT/MBR failed, but didn’t bother too much since UEFI worked.

      >But PCBSD doesn’t look like an OS I would recommend >to an average user yet, you need to improve its looks >and ergonomy and make it more efficient first.

      What is OS you would recommend to ‘an average user’ ?

      I agree that PC-BSD could be make better/nicer/snappier, but still, as I wrote above, I see that PC-BSD/Lumina have a bright future, while most of the trillions Linux distros available are mostly just package workers with some superficial face-lifting on top of that and, imho, it’s just question of time when innovation of PC-BSD/Lumina will show their full potential.

      Sincerely,
      Gour

    • August 11, 2015 at 5:50 pm |

      “But PCBSD doesn’t look like an OS I would recommend to an average user yet, you need to improve its looks and ergonomy and make it more efficient first.”

      Lets say, I’m that kind of average user who don’t feel too comfortable with command lines, and for me PC-BSD with KDE feels WAY better and has way less unnecessary applications than any Linux distribution I’ve tested.

      I like the look of it with KDE that reminds of something in between Windows XP and 7 which is nice and clean.

      I agree that the new web based AppCafe is no good. There are no raw and orphan installed packages to be found as in the old version. An example: Before the latest update still with the old AppCafe in 10.1.1 I installed the XScreensaver, that is now outdated and it’s nowhere to be found in the new AppCafe to uninstall or replace it.

    • Allan
      August 15, 2015 at 6:39 pm |

      “most people unfortunately do judge a book by it’s cover”

      In my experience people who judge a book by its cover get the picture book they deserve.

      Consider also this: it’s impossible to judge reliability of anything at all if you won’t even contemplate for two minutes how it works.

      As I see it, PC-BSD serves up a main course of belt and suspenders with a side order of speedy-zipper embroidery rather than a main course of Angel Food Cake with a side order of Steady Eddie.

      I agree that the new AppCafe was mugged with an ugly stick. But let’s maintain some perspective here. At my current place of employment we just rolled out the Office 365 suite for Windows 7, and the Outlook client is so brutally ugly the nineties would not have dared to invent it. Even the most basic tweaks to the pallid colour scheme are not possible. Compared to that incomprehensible design abomination, I could gaze lovingly at the PC-BSD desktop all day long.

  • Bob
    August 6, 2015 at 6:53 am |

    When I get a chance will get it. Before PCBSD, Unix was a child and barely usable. To make a Unix system this usable and into adulthood, competitive with Linux systems is beyond remarkable. I hope one day others will realize the effort and progress done here as I finally realized after a few month, 3 -4 years ago. Best wishes to all the PCBSD team, you always put your greatest effort into everything you do, along with helping everyone.

  • M.Najafi
    August 6, 2015 at 7:12 am |

    First, I would like to thank you for your attempts towards making a nice desktop out of a robust OS like FreeBSD.
    Having tried too many GNU/Linux distributions and manually configured FreeBSD desktop as well as PCBSD, tha main drawback of FreeBSD-based desktop OS’s is their extremely slow speed during boot time, low performance on laptops in terms of acpi suspend/resume support and speed. As a desktop OS, fully supporting laptops and high performance, I think, is something really required. Lumina as a light DE have help in this regard, although FreeBSD is inherently bloated and slower.
    PCBSD is even more crowded and sluggish.
    Anyway, thanks for the efforts you’re making in PCBSD as the leader of desktop oriented FreeBSD.

    Good luck with your great job in making an original unix based desktop.

  • August 6, 2015 at 10:24 am |

    open-source-feed.comA release feed is added here

    Thanks

  • dir
    August 6, 2015 at 2:45 pm |

    And visited the DistroWatch and PC-BSD was published.

    In first place, I want to congratulate the team of PC-BSD, for their efforts to enable PC-BSD becomes one of the most widely used systems with graphical desktop of the BSD Unix family.

    1. I do not understand as PC-BSD is exclusive for 64-bit architecture, wasting a golden opportunity on 32-bit architecture.

    2. I cannot understand how the PC-BSD implement ZFS file manager instead of the traditional UFS.

    4. The aesthetics of the desktop is very rudimentary and nothing seems to modern times that the end user likes.

    5. The system is too heavy that it consumes many resources of the machine, and nothing compared to modern Linux systems that are complete and fly.

    6. These criticisms are constructive in improving a good operating system, and will be able to take advantage the dissatisfaction of users of windows, and Linux that they are looking for another system without could not.

    6. These criticisms are constructive in improving a good operating system, and will be able to take advantage the dissatisfaction of users of windows, and Linux that they are looking for another system that does not contain SystemD.

    • August 12, 2015 at 7:59 pm |

      1. I guess this is because a 32-bit architecture only can handle 3 GB of RAM, at least that is the case with Windows 32-bit systems.

      2. I’ve understood that ZFS is a more modern, stable, secure and safe file system than UFS.

      So I’m actually happy for this two features.

  • John-S
    August 7, 2015 at 12:00 pm |

    Reading the critiques which nary a one touches on functionality, I’m reminded of how Debian begot Unbuntu, then Unity, then another worthless desktop aimed at porting windows users.

    I spend my day using applications, not wandering virtual art museum of desktop fluff.

    Having a rock solid unix system under the hood that “just works” along with the tools that I earn a living with that are easy to manage and maintain is paramount.

    Keep doing the great work Kris. I contribute to the FreeBSD foundation, and if you’ve a similar “tip” jar, I’d happily toss a few shillings your way. You do what you do very well and it is very appreciated.

  • August 7, 2015 at 4:20 pm |

    I have to applaud the work that goes into PC-BSD (although I use FreeBSD). PC-BSD is pushing BSD into the mainstream, and that’s pretty cool.

    The criticism about the look-and-feel of the system is valid. The default Qt and Gtk themes are pretty hard on the eyes and could look a lot better. Something along the lines of Clearlooks / Cleanlooks and not the hard black borders and weird pill-shaped buttons. I know everyone has their own ideas about style, but PC-BSD could benefit from nicer themes.

    Thanks! 🙂

  • Joe Maloney
    August 7, 2015 at 7:44 pm |

    I’ve been working on some new grub themes, pcdm themes, and wallpapers. It’s not much, and it isn’t great but I’m not an artist.

    https://github.com/pcbsd/pcbsd/commit/54a4166190454d4f23b31cd6abc581d845af0787

    I’d appreciate if others in the community could volunteer to offer up some additional options in that area. I’d like to see some more options.

  • […] Ulteriori dettagli su PC-BSD 10.2-RC1, il cui rilascio in versione finale seguirà molto probabilmente quello di FreeBSD 10.2 alla fine del mese, sono disponibili sul PC-BSD blog. […]

  • August 15, 2015 at 3:13 pm |

    I have also noticed change in installer font from 10.1.2 to 10.2-RC1 (just downloaded RC2 to confirm). I must agree with some of the points made regarding “not-so-appealing” outlook of installer. To me this change of font is also step back.

  • Roger Leigh
    August 20, 2015 at 11:53 am |

    I’ll give the RC a trial shortly. I’ve tried previous versions and while I’ve been impressed with the ease of use and the nice desktop system it gives you, I’ve to date always gone back to vanilla FreeBSD.

    The primary reason is the fact that installing a package/upgrading, as mentioned above, purges everything and then reinstalls everything, plus the changed bits. This is very costly in bandwidth, time and disk. After having spent years using snapshotting systems and developing tools (for Debian) that do automated snapshotting and rollback of the entire system state [schroot], I do wonder why it can’t just snapshot the current state and then install/upgrade/remove only the minimum required. In practice this is really all I need or I suspect anyone needs unless the packages are broken. Under what circumstances is a complete purge and reinstall of everything necessary? I never do this on any FreeBSD install–pkg install/remove/upgrade generally just work.

    Regards,
    Roger

    • Danny Dee
      August 23, 2015 at 3:04 am |

      I have been using PC-BSD for years (and even when a stable production management system is needed!). It is stable, not prone to viruses and a good rescue medium (when dual booting with Windows or Linux-es, for example). But now, as Mr.Andrew and Mr.Roger have already mentioned above, the update process becomes awfully impossible for an average user to support! This is something that will mostly repel the average user! Even now, at the same moment I am writing this letter, my system is making updates and deleting/installing_again all 1046 packages of my systems! Improvements are very welcomed and in need here! If the situation with the updates continues in such a way, I shall stop using PC-BSD in the future. As Mr.Andrew has already said with good exactness, it is a slow, time-consuming and inefficient process to wait for! Best regards from Bulgaria!

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