Sep
08

10.0.3 Quarterly Package Update Released">PC-BSD 10.0.3 Quarterly Package Update Released

The PC-BSD team is pleased to announce the availability of the next PC-BSD quarterly package update, version 10.0.3!

This update includes a number of important bug-fixes, as well as newer packages and desktops. Packages such as Chromium 37.0.2062.94, Cinnamon 2.2.14, Lumina 0.6.2 and more. This release also includes a CD-sized ISO of TrueOS, for users who want to install a server without X. For more details and updating instructions, refer to the notes below.

We are already hard at work on the next major release of PC-BSD, 10.1 later this fall, which will include FreeBSD 10.1-RELEASE under the hood. Users interested in following along with development should sign up for our Testing mailing list.

PC-BSD Notable Changes

* Cinnamon 2.2.14
* Chromium 37.0.2062.94
* NVIDIA Driver 340.24
* Lumina desktop 0.6.2-beta
* Pkg 1.3.7
* Various fixes to the Appcafe Qt UI
* Bugfixes to Warden / jail creation
* Fixed a bug with USB media not always being bootable
* Fixed several issues with Xorg setup
* Improved Boot-Environments to allow “beadm activate” to set default
* Support for jail “bulk” creation via Warden
* Fixes for relative ZFS dataset mount-point creation via Warden
* Support for full-disk (GELI) encryption without an unencrypted /boot partition

TrueOS

Along with our traditional PC-BSD DVD ISO image, we have also created a CD-sized ISO image of TrueOS, our server edition.

This is a text-based installer which includes FreeBSD 10.0-Release under the hood. It includes the following features:

* ZFS on Root installation
* Boot-Environment support
* Command-Line versions of PC-BSD utilities, such as Warden, Life-Preserver and more.
* Support for full-disk (GELI) encryption without an unencrypted /boot partition

We have some additional features also in the works for 10.1 and later, stay tuned this fall for more information.

Updating

Due to some changes with how pkgng works, it is recommended that all users update via the command-line using the following steps:

# pkg update –f
# pkg upgrade pkg
# pkg update –f
# pkg upgrade
# pc-extractoverlay ports
# reboot

PKGNG may need to re-install many of your packages to fix an issue with shared library version detection. If you run into issues doing this, or have conflicts, please open a bug report with the output of the above commands.

If you run into shared library issues running programs after upgrading, you may need to do a full-upgrade with the following:

# pkg upgrade –f

Getting media

10.0.3 DVD/USB media can be downloaded from this URL via HTTP or Torrent.

Reporting Bugs
Found a bug in 10.0.3? Please report it (with as much detail as possible) to our new RedMine Database.

Sep
04

New Lumina source repo and FreeBSD port

By popular demand, the source tree for the Lumina project has just been moved to its own repository within the main PC-BSD project tree on GitHub.

In addition to this, an official FreeBSD port for Lumina was just committed to the FreeBSD ports tree which uses the new repo.

 

By the way, here is a quick usage summary for those that are interested in how “light” Lumina 0.6.2 is on PC-BSD 10.0.3:

System: Netbook with a single 1.6GHz atom processor and 2GB of memory (Fresh installation of PC-BSD 10.0.3 with Lumina 0.6.2)

Usage: ~0.20.4% CPU and ~120MB active memory use (no apps running except an xterm with “top” after a couple minutes for the PC-BSD tray applications to start up and settle down)

 

Aug
26

10.0.3 Preview: Lumina Desktop">PC-BSD 10.0.3 Preview: Lumina Desktop

As we are getting ready for PC-BSD 10.0.3, I wanted to share a little preview of what to expect with the Lumina desktop environment as you move from version 0.4.0 to 0.6.2.

To give you a quick summary, pretty much everything has been updated/refined, with several new utilities written specifically for Lumina. The major new utility is the “Insight” file manager: with ZFS snapshot integration, multimedia player, and image slideshow viewer capabilities built right in by default. It also has a new snapshot utility and the desktop configuration utility has been completely rewritten. I am going to be listing more details about all the updates between the versions below, but for those of you who are not interested in the details, you can just take a look at some screenshots instead.…  :-)

Lumina10-0-3--1

 

Lumina10-0-3--2

Lumina10-0-3--3

 

Lumina10-0-3--4

Lumina10-0-3--5

 

==== FULL UPDATE DETAILS ====

(Moving from 0.4.0 to 0.6.2)
Desktop

- A desktop plugin system has been implemented, with two plugins available at the moment (a calandar plugin, and an application launcher plugin).
– The panel plugin system has been refined quite a bit, with transparency support for the panel itself and automatic plugin resizing for example.
– A new panel plugin has been added: the system dashboard. This plugin allows control over the audio volume, screen brightness, and current workspace, while also displaying the current battery status (if applicable) and containing a button to let the user log out (or shutdown/restart the system).
– The user button panel plugin has been re-implemented as well, and incorporating the functionality of the desktopbar plugin. Now the user has quick access to files/application in the ~/Desktop folder, as well as the ability to add/remove shortcuts to system applications in the desktop folder with one click.
– New backgrounds wallpapers and project logo (courtesy of iXsystems).

NOTE: Users of the older versions of the Lumina desktop will have their configuration files returned to the defaults after logging in to the new version for the first time.


Utilities
The new file manager (lumina-fm, also called “Insight”):
Features:
– Browse the system and allow the bookmarking of favorite directories
– Simple multimedia player to allow playing/previewing multimedia files
– Image slideshow viewer for previewing image files
– Full ZFS file/directory restore functionality if ZFS snapshots are available
– Menu shortcuts to quickly browse attached/mounted devices
– Tabbing support for browsing multiple directories at once
– Standard file/directory management (copy/paste/delete/create)
– Supported multimedia and image formats are auto-detected on start, so if a particular file is not recognized, you just need to install the appropriate library or plugin on your system to provide support (none required by default).

The new screenshot utility (lumina-screenshot):
Features:
– Simple utility to create/save screenshots on the system.
– Can capture the entire system, or individual windows.
– Can delay the image capture for a few seconds as necessary
– Automatically assigned to the “Print Screen” keyboard shortcut by default, but also listed in the application registry under utilities.

The configuration utility (lumina-config):
Features:
– Competely new implementation
– Configure desktop appearance (background image, add desktop plugins)
– Configure panels (location, color/transparency, size, manage plugins, up to 2 panels supported per screen)
– Configure right-click menu plugins
– Manage/set global keyboard shortcuts (including shortcuts for adjusting audio volume or screen brightness)
– Manage/set default applications for the system by categories or individually
– Manage session options (enable numlock on log in, play audio chimes)
– Manage/set applications/files to be launched on log in
– Manage window system options (appearance, mouse focus policy, window placement policy, number of workspaces)

The application/file opener utility (lumina-open):
– Update the overall appearance of the application selector window.
– Fully support registered mime-types on the system now, and recommend those applications as appropriate.

Jul
07

31 — Warden CLI upgrade + IRC Announcement">PC-BSD Feature Digest 31 — Warden CLI upgrade + IRC Announcement

Hey everyone!  After a brief hiatus from feature updates we are back!  We’ve switched from Fridays to Mondays and rather than trying to get an update out every week we aren’t on a specific schedule.  We will continue to push out these feature updates when we have some cool new features come out we think you’ll want to know about.

The Warden and PBI_add backend (CLI)  management tools have received some exciting new features we’d like to tell you about.  You can now create jails on the fly when adding a new PBI to your application library.  For instance say you’re adding a PBI using the “pbi_add” command and you want to install the PBI into a new jail that you haven’t created yet.  You would specify:  “sudo pbi_add –J apache” without the quotes to create a default named jail with the PBI apache installed directly into it.  The –J being the new flag that specifies the creation of the new jail.

There’s also a new option now to do a bulk jail creation.  By simply using the new –bulk and –ip4pool flag you can easily roll out your preset number of jails quickly and efficiently.  To use this cool new feature just type:  “warden create <jailname> –bulk 5 –ip4pool 192.168.0.2″ and voila you’ve got 5 brand spanking new jails created in no time starting at IP address 192.168.0.2 .

The PC-BSD team is now hanging out in IRC!  Get involved in the conversation and come  visit us on Freenode in channel #pcbsd.  We look forward to seeing you there!

May
02

27 — Software System Redesign">Weekly Feature Digest 27 — Software System Redesign

PC-BSD has long been very flexible about how you can install software. You have PBI’s, packages, and ports available with just a couple clicks or via a couple of simple terminal commands. For a long time the PBI format has served as an excellent solution for people who may need an offline package install, or just simply prefer the ease and simplicity the PBI format has to offer especially via the AppCafe. Perhaps the “Achilles’ Heel” of this situation is that we have also been severely limited on the amount of software that the AppCafe has to offer as packages had to first be converted into the PBI format.

This week we are announcing a radical change that we think will benefit all PC-BSD users in ways that were previously unthinkable. The PC-BSD team has begun work during the last couple of weeks redesigning our PC-BSD utilities (AppCafe, Update Center) to work with our pkgng software repository that we are currently building to contain detailed information about all the software available through packages and PBIs. What this means for you is that in the near future PC-BSD will have a much broader software pool to pull from, and will not be limited anymore by only having a small subset of PBI’s. You will now be able to install packages and PBI’s in one place, while also being able to update and manage both in one place.

You may be asking yourself “why the change?”. Over the last several months we have noticed a considerable amount of our time has been going into compatibility and fixes for PBIs. So much time in fact that other important development had to be postponed and / or sidelined while we worked on bringing PBIs up to speed. We are hoping by adopting appcafe and the PBI format to work in tandem with pkgng, that we will be able to refocus our efforts on other important endeavours.

We will have more information available soon as development continues on how you can get involved with testing out the new features and submitting ideas to help the project along. Let us know what you think about the changes. Are we headed in the right direction? Do you have ideas related to the redesign that you’d like to contribute? Let us know!

Key Features:

Much larger software library. Instead of 800 available appcafe applications think more like 10000+
Detailed information on all the software available including packages in one place
Ability to search and filter your results to show
Improved compatibility across desktop environments
New rating system is being developed for grading the quality of packages in the AppCafe library

Apr
26

Quick Lumina Desktop FAQ

I am seeing lots of interest and questions about Lumina since it was mentioned in the PC-BSD weekly update last week, so I am just going to try and answer some of the big questions that I have been seeing.

(1) What is Lumina?
Answer: Lumina is a lightweight, BSD licensed, standards-compliant desktop environment based upon Qt and Fluxbox. It is being developed on PC-BSD, and is being packaged for distribution on the PC-BSD package repository as well (although I believe the FreeBSD port is going to be submitted to the FreeBSD ports tree by the PC-BSD project as well).

(2) How complete is it?
Answer: It is currently alpha version 0.1, so lots of things are still unfinished. It has full backend XDG-compliance through the “lumina-open” utility for launching applications or opening files/URLs, but the graphical interface is still being fleshed out. It also has a plugin framework for toolbars, toolbar plugins, and desktop plugins already written, even though there is not many plugins written to actually use yet.

(3) Since it is an alpha, is it usable?
Answer: Yes, if you are used to very minimalistic desktops. I would currently label it a step above pure Fluxbox for usability, since it uses the XDG compatibility to provide access to system applications and desktop files, and is tied in to xdg-open on PC-BSD so that individual applications can open files/URLs using the current system default for that type of file/URL. The main thing is that the interface is extremely bare at the moment (no desktop icons/plugins yet), so you just end up with a background and toolbar(s). It is also still missing some configuration utilities, so you might be stuck with the current defaults for the moment.

(4) Why create a new desktop environment? Whats wrong with KDE/GNOME/XFCE/<other>?
Answer: There are many reasons for needing a new desktop environment instead of using the existing ones, mainly because all the major existing DE’s are developed on/for Linux, not BSD. This causes all sorts of problems on BSD, and I am going to try and list a few of the big ones here:

(4-a) Porting time
Since the DE’s are written on/for linux, they have to be ported over to BSD, and this introduces a (sometimes significant) time-delay before updated versions are available (GNOME 3 anyone?).

(4-b) Porting quality
It takes quite a bit of time/effort to port a DE over to BSD, and I have to give lots of thanks to the people who volunteer their time and energy to make them available. The problem is that quite often “linuxisms” still bleed through the porting process and cause system instability, desktop/X crashes, and loss of usability on the part of the user. This is particularly true when you start looking at KDE/GNOME/XFCE because of the large number of individual pieces/applications/plugins that have to be checked during the porting process, and it gets quite difficult to check everything while doing the port.

(4-c) Linux development trends
As Linux trends continue to diverge from BSD through reliance on Linux kernel functions or Linux-specific systems/daemons, the porting process over to BSD is going to get even more difficult and take longer to accomplish. This means that if we want to have a reliable/stable desktop on BSD going forward, we have to have one designed specifically for the BSD’s.

(4-d) Linux dependency bloat.
If you look at current DE dependency lists, it is easy to see that when you install a desktop, you might be getting a lot more than you bargained for (such as additional compilers/programming languages, network libraries/daemons, audio/video daemons/applications, etc). While there might be some debate on this, my opinion is that it comes from the Linux distro mentality. Just as a Linux distribution is the Linux kernel + the distro’s favorite packages, the desktop environment is becoming the graphical interface for the system + all the favorite applications/libraries of the developers, whether or not they are actually necessary for satisfying the actual purpose of a desktop environment.
I feel like the approach on BSD is quite different because the OS is a complete entity, independent of the packages that get added later, and simply provides the framework for the user to do whatever they want with system. By this same approach, a desktop environment should simply provide the graphical framework/interface for the user to easily interact with the system, independent of what applications are actually installed on the system. Now, I understand that at this point in time a user expects that certain types of applications are expected to be available out-of-box (such as a file manager, audio/video player, pdf viewer, text editor, photo viewer, etc..), but is that really the realm of the DE to decide what the defaults are, or should it be left to the distributor of the OS? I think a point can be made that the file manager is considered essential to integrate with the DE appropriately, but I think that things like audio/video applications, text editors, pdf viewers and such are really up to the preferences of the distributor, not the DE. The DE just needs to provide a simple framework to setup those initial default applications for the distributor, not require a ton of additional applications by default. Because of this, I am taking the approach that Lumina will have a very limited number of applications included by default (there are only about 23 that I can think of, all written from scratch for Lumina), and will try to include basic user-level functionality within these few applications to try and cover 90% of standard user needs (at a basic level) without any additional dependencies. For example, the Lumina file manager will have basic audio/video playing and image viewing capabilities built-in because those types of abilities are available through the Qt framework without many/any additional dependencies.

(5) What kind of graphical appearance are you planning for Lumina?
Answer: Highly configurable… :-)
By default, I am planning for Lumina to have a single toolbar on the top of the primary screen with the following item (from left to right): UserButton, DesktopBar, TaskManager, SystemTray, and Clock. This toolbar can be configured as the user desires (or completely removed), and other toolbars can also be added as well (only two per screen at the moment, one on top and one on bottom).
I do *not* plan on having the desktop be covered with the traditional desktop icons (that is taken care of with the DesktopBar toolbar plugin). Instead, it is simply a graphical canvas for the user to place all sorts of desktop plugins (directory viewers, picture viewers, notepads, application launchers, and other “stuff”).  I have not decided on any default desktop plugins yet, simply because I have not written any yet.

(6) What is the “User Button”?
Answer: This is what would correspond to the “Start” button on other desktops. This provides a central place for the user to do things like launch an application, open up one of their directories, configure their desktop settings, or close down their desktop session. Basically, an easy way for the user to interface with the system.

(7) What is the “Desktop Bar”?
Answer: This is a toolbar plugin that takes the place of the traditional system of desktop icons. The original purpose of desktop icons was to provide quick shortcuts for the user to open applications or put links to commonly-used files/directories, but quickly became abused with people putting everything on the desktop — destroying the intended purpose of the desktop by forcing the user to spend a lot of time trying to find the particular item they need in the chaos that became the desktop (I am sure you have all seen this many times). The desktop bar takes the original purpose of the desktop, and refines it to provide the quick access the user needs even if there is tons of “stuff” in the ~/Desktop folder. It does this by an intelligent system of sorting/categorization, splitting up the desktop items into three main categories: application shortcuts, directories, and files. Each of these three categories gets it’s own button on the toolbar with items sorted alphabetically (if there is anything in that category), so that it is easily accessed by the user at any time, even if you have the desktop covered with open windows, or you have a lot of that type of item. Additionally, it also separates out the actual files in the desktop folder by type: audio files, video files, pictures, and “other”. This should also help people find “that one file” that they need with a minimum of effort.

(8) Is Lumina the new default desktop for PC-BSD?
Answer:  NO!!! While Lumina is now available on the PC-BSD package repository, it is by no means the new default desktop.

 

(9) Will it become the default desktop for PC-BSD eventually?

Answer: Possibly, it really depends on how well the development on Lumina goes and if  the PC-BSD development team decides to make the switch to it at a later date.

 

(10) Will it become the *only* supported PC-BSD desktop?

Answer: Definitely not!! PC-BSD will continue to support multiple desktop environments and window managers through both the installer and the post-installation package manager.
I hope this help to clear up some of the questions you have!

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